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1 (VII) BRIGADIER-GENERAL JOHN THOMAS WILDER. son of Reuben and Mary (Merritt) Wilder, was born at Hunter Village, Greene County, New York, January 31, 1830, and died at Jacksonville, Florida October 20, 1917. Internment was in Forest Hills Cemetery, Chattanooga, Tennessee.

As a boy he served as an apprentice draftsman in a millwright plant at Columbus, Ohio, later establishing his own foundry and mill at Greensburg, Indiana. By the time of the outbreak of the Civil War his business was a success and his products were sold in Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Virginia, Kentucky, and Tennessee. He was member of the Democratic party when the war commenced, but decided that he would support the Union cause and had two six-pound cannon cast in his foundry. In May, 1861, he organized a light artillery for the first three-year regiment recruited in Indiana, which was mustered into service as Company K of the 17th Indiana Infantry, with Wilder as captain. June 12, 1861, he was appointed by Governor Oliver P. Morton lieutenant-colonel of the 17th Indiana Volunteer Infantry and was advanced to colonelcy the following year. His command first saw service in West Virginia and was with Buell’s army in the second day’s battle at Shiloh. It was after this that he was given command, as senior colonel, of a brigade which served at Munfordville, Kentucky, and in the Tullahoma campaign in Middle Tennessee. In June, 1863, when Hoover’s Gap in the Cumberland Mountains was held by a strong Confederate force to give Bragg’s main army time to fall back toward Chattanooga, Wilder’s brigade forced the gap open and pursued its defenders when they retreated. As a result of the engagement the command came to be known as “Wilder’s Lightning Brigade.” It was composed of the Indiana and Illinois infantry regiments, but differed from other infantry commands in that his men were equipped, at the insistance of Wilder, with the then new model Spencer repeating rifles, and its troopers were mounted. Cist, the historian of the Army of the Cumberland, wrote in 1897, to President McKinley: “General Sheridan told me just after the battle of Chickamauga that he would rather have Wilder’s military reputation than that of any other man in the service.” On August 6, 1864, Wilder was brevetted brigadier-general in recognition of his services.

Resigning from the army in October, 1864, he removed to Chattanooga, Tennessee, and took part in leading the development of natural resources around that city. He founded the Roane Iron Works and built one of the first blast furnaces in the South. In 1870 he established a rail mill at Chattanooga, and was also active in the promotion and construction of the Charleston, Cincinnati & Chicago railroad. For himself and his associates he acquired about half a million acres of iron and coal lands in Kentucky, Virginia, North Carolina and Tennessee, and built the Carnegie furnace at Johnson City. He was mayor and postmaster, at Chattanooga, pension agent at Knoxville, and commissioner of Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Park. He was a member of the American Institute of Mining Engineers, and an honorary member of the Iron and Steel Institute of Great Britain. President Benjamin Harrison asked General Wilder to serve as his Secretary of War, but he refused.

Brigadier-General John Thomas Wilder married (first), May 18, 1858, Martha Jane Stewart. (Stewart III.) He married (second), in 1904, Dora E. Lee, of North Carolina, whose father was a captain in the Confederate Army. 
WILDER John Thomas (I355)
 
2 1910 federal census of parents family indicates Willis deceased prior to census date of May 10, 1910. PENSINGER, Willis (I1061)
 
3 Oscar is related to Flora Murray who married Sarah's uncle John K. Fisher. MURRAY, Oscar (I792)
 
4 "Glode American" should read Globe American. Source (S14)
 
5 "Surviving are...three brothers, Dewey Smith of El Paso, Orville Smith of Glasford..." should read two brothers. Carrie's third brother Julian prceded her in death in 1935. Son Emery C. Jr. died during WWII. Carrie's sister Anna Mae died in 1958. Source (S17)
 
6 (John Fisher) is the son of Thomas and Polly (Kells) Fisher, and was the ninth child of a family of 10 children, all of whom are now living, except William, the eldest child. Thomas Fisher was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, March 11, 1791, and died at his home in Blandinsville, in 1868. He settled in McDonough county in 1844, coming from Hancock county, Illinois, where he had settled in 1840. His first wife died, and he was again married to Elizabeth Brown, by whom there were four children. Being a mechanic by trade, or rather a mill-wright, on coming to Blandinsville he built a saw and grist mill there, besides other mills in the county, working at the trade for nearly 20 years.  Family F75
 
7 ...George Foster, a native of Virginia; he settled in Hire township, coming from Michigan here, and died at his home January 26,1868, having lost his wife in 1855, and both lie in Good Hope cemetery (Should read New Hope, also called Blandinsville South Cemetery--ed). Family F34
 
8 1st marriage; married 10 years
Four children, all living
Can read and write 
KAISER, Nellie Jane (I1553)
 
9 1st marriage; married 10 years
Occupation: Farmer, general farm
Can read and write
Owns farm, mortgaged 
JOHNSTON, William (I1552)
 
10 A curious find. Ella, listed as a widow, and with her children shown living among Mexican salt miners in Kansas while husband and father Orville B. Fisher is listed as living with his father Abel Fisher in Blandinsville, McDonough Co., IL. Also no occupations is listed for any of the family despite both Paul and Leslie being old enough to work. How did family support itself? Ella's husband Orville apparently never joins family in Kansas, remarries in 1921 and fathers a second family in Illinois. Ella (I220)
 
11 A curious find. Family with mother Ella, listed as a widow, shown living among Mexican salt miners in Kansas while father Orville B. Fisher is found as living with his father Abel Fisher in Blandinsville, McDonough Co., IL. Also no occupations is listed for any of the family despite both Leslie and brother Paul being old enough to work. How did family support itself? Leslie's father apparently never joins family in Kansas, remarries in 1921 and fathers a second family in Illinois. FISHER, Leslie (I222)
 
12 A curious find. Family with mother Ella, listed as a widow, shown living among Mexican salt miners in Kansas while father Orville B. Fisher is found as living with his father Abel Fisher in Blandinsville, McDonough Co., IL. Also no occupations is listed for any of the family despite both Paul and brother Leslie being old enough to work. How did family support itself? Paul's father apparently never joins family in Kansas, remarries in 1921 and fathers a second family in Illinois. FISHER, Paul Vernon (I221)
 
13 A few errors by census-taker: John and Margaret were born in Pennsylvania to Thomas and his first wife Mary Kells Fisher. Cyrus should read Matthias. Have seen no other reference to Matthias' first or middle name being Cyrus. FISHER Thomas (I115)
 
14 A few errors by census-taker: John and Margaret were born in Pennsylvania to Thomas and his first wife Mary Kells Fisher. Cyrus should read Matthias. Have seen no other reference to Matthias' first or middle name being Cyrus. BROWN Elizabeth (I62)
 
15 A few errors by census-taker: John and Margaret were born in Pennsylvania to Thomas and his first wife Mary Kells Fisher. Cyrus should read Matthias. Have seen no other reference to Matthias' first or middle name being Cyrus. FISHER Matthias (I101)
 
16 A few errors by census-taker: John and Margaret were born in Pennsylvania to Thomas and his first wife Mary Kells Fisher. Cyrus should read Matthias. Have seen no other reference to Matthias' first or middle name being Cyrus. FISHER Thomas H. (I116)
 
17 A few errors by census-taker: John and Margaret were born in Pennsylvania to Thomas and his first wife Mary Kells Fisher. Cyrus should read Matthias. Have seen no other reference to Matthias' first or middle name being Cyrus. FISHER Josiah (I186)
 
18 A few errors by census-taker: John and Margaret were born in Pennsylvania to Thomas and his first wife Mary Kells Fisher. Cyrus should read Matthias. Have seen no other reference to Matthias' first or middle name being Cyrus. FISHER Abel (I73)
 
19 A few errors by census-taker: John and Margaret were born in Pennsylvania to Thomas and his first wife Mary Kells Fisher. Cyrus should read Matthias. Have seen no other reference to Matthias' first or middle name being Cyrus. FISHER Margaret (I178)
 
20 A few errors by census-taker: John and Margaret were born in Pennsylvania to Thomas and his first wife Mary Kells Fisher. Cyrus should read Matthias. Have seen no other reference to Matthias' first or middle name being Cyrus. FISHER John K. (I180)
 
21 Abe Pensinger was survived by his wife Belle and sons Faye of Jordan, Minn. and Earl of Tennessee, Ill. Sons Willis and Hollis preceded him in death. PENSINGER Abraham Lincoln (I139)
 
22 Abel Fisher, lumber inspector and foreman of the lumber yards of the P., Ft. W. & C. Ry. at Fort Wayne, was born in Lawrence county, Penn., on March 29, 1844. He is the son of Abel Fisher, born in the same county, whose father was John Fisher, an officer in the war of 1812, and one of the pioneers of Lawrence county, Penn. His wife was a sister to Bishop Roberts, the pioneer Methodist who was bishop of what was then known as the Erie conference, numbering all the Methodist Episcopal churches west of the Alleghany mountains. The mother of the subject of this mention was Polly Gibson, whose father was a native of Pennsylvania and a pioneer of Lawrence county. Abel Fisher, sr., now over seventy years of age, is a resident of Iola, Kan., where he owns and manages a hotel. He also conducts a hotel at Victoria, Kan. His wife died in 1858. Abel Fisher, jr., was reared on a farm in Lawrence county, Penn., and after obtaining a common school education, he learned the miller's trade, and worked at the same until at the age of seventeen years and three months. In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company G, of the Sixty-second Pennsylvania regiment of volunteer infantry, as a private. He served three years, and was discharged at the expiration of his time at Pittsburgh, July 4, 1864. He was wounded in the right wrist at the battle of Gaines' Mill on the Peninsula. Returning to Pennsylvania, he finished his trade and worked at it in Lawrence county until 1869, when he came to Fort Wayne. He was engaged with the railroad company as foreman of the lumber yards, and three months later was made inspector. Mr. Fisher was married in 1869 to Jennie Waddington, of Fort Wayne, who was born in Crestline, Ohio. To them three children have been born: Maude M., wife of E. J. Pirson, of Columbus, Ohio, Walter B. and William. FISHER Alexander Abel (I1048)
 
23 Abel Fisher, son of Abel Fisher, was born at Mt. Mellick, Ireland, about 1730, and died at Fort Ligonier, Westmoreland County Pennsylvania. He served some time in the British army as a dragoon and, following his discharge he married Rachel Whoowee or Howee, a Quakeress who was born at Eddenderry (Edenderry). They immediately sailed for America, the voyage lasting three months, and landed in Philadelphia. Mr. Fisher left one brother, Henry and one half-sister, Nancy Lake, while his wife left brothers William and Mathias, and three sisters, Mollie, Nancy and Hannah. Of these relatives none were ever known to come to America except Henry Fisher. The family kept track of him for some time, but for many years now all trace of him and his family has been lost. After his arrival in this country, Abel Fisher and his wife settled at Cape May, New Jersey, where the family resided for about twenty years and where their children were born. While there he owned a small boat in which he carried oysters to Philadelphia and brought back domestic goods.

In 1773, he concluded to immigrate to what was then the West. Procuring a wagon and a team of horses, he started for the redstone country, near the line between Westmoreland and Fayette Counties, Pennsylvania. After a terrible journey over bad roads and mountains, late in the fall they reached a point one mile west of Fort Ligonier, now Ligonier Borough, where their team gave out and refused to go any further. Here they remained through the winter and finally concluded to make the neighborhood their permanent home. Subsequently, Mr. Fisher purchased a tract of three hundred acres of land, two miles west of Ligonier, on the Two Mile Run. This land remained in the possession of the family for more than one hundred years.

Just as they commenced to make an improvement on their land the Revolutionary War broke out, and as they were on the frontier, and exposed to Indian raids, the family removed to York, Pennsylvania, where the women remained until the close of the war. Mr. Fisher and the two oldest boys returned to Ligonier, and lived amidst constant alarms and danger, the Indians killing some of the settlers every year. Sometime, during the war, Mr. Fisher died in the fort, it was said, of pleurisy. As was common, with the early settlers he requested that he be buried on his own farm. A squad of soldiers accompanied the funeral procession and while they committed dust to dust, armed men stood around in the bushes to guard against surprise by Indians. He was an industrious and thrifty man, and under more favorable circumstances would have succeeded well. 
FISHER Abel (I199)
 
24 Abel Fisher...left one brother, Henry..." FISHER Henry (I958)
 
25 Abel McDowell home Family F192
 
26 Abel purchases Cottage Grove Hotel. FISHER Abel (I981)
 
27 Abel's house is packed with eight people in this census. Difficult to even speculate on the identity of many of these. The census lists: one "Free White Males under 10" - presumably a nephew; one "Free White Males over 45" -Abel himself; one "Free White Females under 10" - likely a niece; one "Free White Females 10 to 15" - another niece; one "Free White Female 16 to 25" - another niece; and three "Free White Females 45 and over." One of these is presumably Abel's wife Rachel Forbes. Candidates for the other two females include Abel's mother Rachel Hoowe Fisher, although she would have been in her nineties in 1810; sister Elizabeth, little is known about her; or a Stewart or McDowell relation, Abel's sister Rachel presumably having married Jacob Stewart by this time and sister Hannah definitely married to Samuel McDowell around 1790. Note that the previous census also had three women over 45 living with Abel. At least one of the older women in this census is probably the mother of the children listed in the census. There is no record of Abel having children. FISHER Abel (I201)
 
28 Abel's house is packed with eight people in this census. Difficult to even speculate on the identity of many of these. The census lists: one "Free White Males under 10" - presumably a nephew; one "Free White Males over 45" -Abel himself; one "Free White Females under 10" - likely a niece; one "Free White Females 10 to 15" - another niece; one "Free White Female 16 to 25" - another niece; and three "Free White Females 45 and over." One of these is presumably Abel's wife Rachel Forbes. Candidates for the other two females include Abel's mother Rachel Hoowe Fisher, although she would have been in her nineties in 1810; sister Elizabeth, little is known about her; or a Stewart or McDowell relation, Abel's sister Rachel presumably having married Jacob Stewart by this time and sister Hannah definitely married to Samuel McDowell around 1790. Note that the previous census also had three women over 45 living with Abel. At least one of the older women in this census is probably the mother of the children listed in the census. There is no record of Abel having children. FORBES, Rachel (I346)
 
29 Abel's house is packed with eight people in this census. Difficult to even speculate on the identity of many of these. The census lists: one "Free White Males under 10" - presumably a nephew; one "Free White Males over 45" -Abel himself; one "Free White Females under 10" - likely a niece; one "Free White Females 10 to 15" - another niece; one "Free White Female 16 to 25" - another niece; and three "Free White Females 45 and over." One of these is presumably Abel's wife Rachel Forbes. Candidates for the other two females include Abel's mother Rachel Hoowe Fisher, although she would have been in her nineties in 1810; sister Elizabeth, little is known about her; or a Stewart or McDowell relation, Abel's sister Rachel presumably having married Jacob Stewart by this time and sister Hannah definitely married to Samuel McDowell around 1790. Note that the previous census also had three women over 45 living with Abel. At least one of the older women in this census is probably the mother of the children listed in the census. There is no record of Abel having children. FISHER Elizabeth (I347)
 
30 Abel's name spelled incorrectly as Able
Living with son Orville Fisher
Owns home
Listed as widowed
Occupation: None 
FISHER Abel (I73)
 
31 Abel's name spelled incorrectly as Able
Married 28 years
Occupation: Day laborer
Can read and write
Owns home 
FISHER Abel (I73)
 
32 Abel, the oldest son, never married, but continued to live on the farm with his mother and sisters until he died of old age, his four score years. His education was very limited, but he could read, and did, until he became the best historian in that part of the country. He acquired the habit of fast reading, (or glancing) as he termed it, thus getting the marrow out of a book without reading one fourth of it. His thirst for knowledge continued to the last. When on his death bed, he requested daily to have the papers read to him. He was one of the most religious men the writer ever knew. His life went out calm as a summer evening. FISHER Abel (I201)
 
33 Able to read and write: yes
Can speak English
Occupation: Roller Copper Works
At work yesterday: No 
WITKOWICZ, John (I1475)
 
34 Able to read and write: yes
Can speak English
Occupation: Winder, Cotton Mill
At work yesterday: Yes 
WITKOWICZ, Maryanna (I1477)
 
35 About 1810-12 a schoolhouse was built of round logs on what was some years ago the Daniel Davidson property. The building was erected by the McCrearys, who before this had schools in their own houses. McCreary had a still house near by, and during intermissions the teachers in the old schoolhouse were accustomed to go to the still and take their regular drams, a custom which happily does not prevail nowadays. McCREARY, Samuel (I1600)
 
36 About 1817 Thomas and John Fisher built a woolen-mill in Eastbrook, above the site of their saw-mill. FISHER John (I215)
 
37 According to the marriage consent written by Nancy's father William Walter, Nancy's surname is Walter not Walters. Source (SR42)
 
38 According to the marriage consent written by Nancy's father William Walter, Nancy's surname is Walter not Walters. Source (SR41)
 
39 According to Wesley's obit, he was born in Tubbsmills, PA. Cannot identify specific location. No towns, streams or other geography currently carry this name. Tubbs families from which the location likely derived its name operated mills all over up state New York and Pennsylvania during 1800s. FISHER Wesley Stewart (I307)
 
40 Addie apparently nickname for Ida. HOSKINSON, Ida L. (I1174)
 
41 Address listed as 2029 Beck
Owns home, mortgaged, home value: $1000; Mortgage:$500
Years in Iowa 7 years
Education: Grade school, fifth grade, can read/write
Name of Father: Abraham Fisher; Mother: Edith Parker
Religion: Methodist 
SMITH, George W. (I1133)
 
42 Address listed as Drowning Creek Road.
Notes first married at 19.
Occupation: Framer, Truck Farm.
Jerry's sister Pauline living with the family. 
KAYLOR, Jeremiah Mirah (I658)
 
43 Address listed as Glasford, Peoria Co., IL.
Occupation: TP&W Railroad
Contact person: Mrs. Margaret Willock in Pekin, IL. Presumably this is married name of Orville's daughter Margaret.
Appearance: 5'-6", 215 lbs, blue eyes, red hair and ruddy complexion. 
SMITH, Orville Elwood (I169)
 
44 Address listed as Good Hope, IL.
Occupation: Section Laborer, TP&W Railroad, Good Hope, IL.
Seeks exemption from draft due to having dependent wife and child.
Appearance: Medium height, medium build, light blue eyes and light hair. 
SMITH, Orville Elwood (I169)
 
45 Address listed as North or Mouth Drowning Creek Road.
Occupation: Farmer, General Farm. 
KAYLOR, Matthew Hugh (I671)
 
46 Address listed as North or Mouth Drowning Creek Road.
Occupation: Farmer, Truck? farm. 
KAYLOR, Jeremiah Mirah (I658)
 
47 Address: 1202 Millman St, Peoria, IL
Renting home; rent $35/month
Married at age 17
Can read and write 
SMITH Anna Mae (I165)
 
48 Address: 1202 Millman St, Peoria, IL
Renting home; rent $35/month
Married at age 21
Can read and write
Occupation: Brakeman, Railroad
Not a veteran 
LOMAX Orville L. (I754)
 
49 Address: 2101 Ave N, Fort Madison, IA
Owns home, Value: $500
Age of first marriage: 21
Birthplace of George's parents incorrectly listed as Ohio. Both parents born in Illinois.
Occupation: Odd jobs
Veteran: no; indicates George was not drafted in WW 1 after registering 
SMITH, George W. (I1133)
 
50 Address: Blandinsville, IL.
Occupation: Daily Laborer.
Seeks exemption for support of family.
Appearance: Tall, stout, brown eyes, black hair.
 
HARDISTY, Guy (I125)
 

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